Past Issues of the Putnam Town Crier



Monday: No school --- Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Putnam Elementary/Middle
Every day: Fruit. Tuesday: Spaghetti, meatball dinner, roasted vegetables. Wednesday - elementary: Sloppy Joes, corn, sugar cookies. Wednesday - middle: Sloppy Joe Tater Tots. Thursday: Chicken nuggets rice bake, broccoli. Friday: Stuffed-crust pizza, Caesar salad.
Putnam High
Tuesday: Italian meatball spaghetti dinner or bacon cheeseburgers. Wednesday: Chicken tenders or chicken Caesar wraps. Thursday: Pasta Bolognese or "Wild Mike's" cheese bites. Friday: French bread pizza or buffalo popcorn chicken baskets.
Pomfret Community
Alternates: Grilled cheese, Yogurt Fun Lunch, Sunbutter & Jelly. Tuesday: Beef hot dogs, BBQ baked beans. Wednesday: Spicy or plain chicken patty sandwiches. Thursday: Rodeo burgers. Friday: Cheese pizza, green beans.
Woodstock Public Schools
Tuesday: French toast sticks, sausage, fruit. Wednesday: Chicken tenders, dipping sauce, mashed potatoes, wax beans, fruit. Thursday: Pizza, salad, fruit. Friday: No school - Professional Development.

.
 


Graduates
REAL Custom Training celebrated its most recent group of leadership development graduates. Twelve employees from Putnam Plastics Corporation, Foster Corporation, Paquette Electric Company, and Pursuit Aerospace received honorary plaques recognizing their completion of the 16-week, 48-hour Foundations of Leadership program. The Foundations of Leadership program covers a range of topics including effective communication, team management, problem-solving, and decision-making strategies.

.



NDDH: ‘Plan Raid on Radon’
Health dept. offers free radon test kits
BROOKLYN — The Northeast District Department of Health (NDDH) is partnering with the Connecticut Department of Public Health (DPH) to educate residents about the dangers of radon exposure and to encourage them to take action to protect their families and home.
NDDH is launching its ‘Plan a Raid on Radon’ campaign and has a limited supply of free radon test kits and educational materials for district residents. Visit the health department at 69 South Main St. in Brooklyn to receive one free radon test kit per home with instructions for use and a radon fact sheet. Participants will receive a follow-up call from Stephanie Hynes, our Community Health Worker, within two weeks to ensure the kit was used and returned to the manufacturer according to instructions for analysis.
“Radon is gas that you can’t see or smell. It comes from the breakdown of rocks, soil, and water and can be in the air inside your home. It doesn’t matter if your house is new or old, or if it has a basement or not, radon can still be present.” says Isaac Combs, NDDH Environmental Health Specialist. “In Connecticut, radon levels can be high in different places, and even houses next to each other may have different levels. The U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says that around 1 in 15 homes in the U.S. have high levels of radon. Radon is a serious health risk, which can be reduced in several different ways, with the first step being to test your home for this harmful gas. Act now and encourage your friends and family to do the same.”
Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers and the second leading cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. Smokers exposed to radon have a much higher risk for developing lung cancer. The EPA and the Surgeon General’s office estimate that radon is responsible for more than 21,000 lung cancer deaths each year in the U.S.
It takes many years for lung cancer to develop. Most people do not have symptoms until lung cancer is advanced and harder to treat. The good news is that lung cancer from radon is preventable and simple steps can be taken to reduce the risk of radon exposure.
Ways to keep radon levels low:
* Increase air flow in your house by opening windows and using fans and vents to circulate air. However, natural ventilation in any type of house is only a temporary strategy to reduce radon.
* Seal cracks in floors and walls with plaster, caulk, or other materials designed for this purpose.
* You can cover the earth floor in crawl spaces with a high-density plastic sheet. A vent pipe and fan can be used to blow the radon from under the sheet and vent it to the outdoors.
Radon levels vary seasonally and tend to be higher in the winter months. The best time to test for radon is between the months of November through March. Windows and outside doors should remain closed as much as possible during radon testing.
NDDH is unable to reserve kits or mail them. Test kits can also be purchased from a local hardware store or the American Lung Association by calling 1-800-LUNG-USA or by visiting www.lung.org.
The EPA recommends that homes with radon levels at or above 4.0 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) be fixed. Homeowners should consider reducing their potential lung cancer risk by fixing homes with radon levels between 2 pCi/L and 4 pCi/L.
Radon levels can be reduced by hiring certified radon mitigation professionals who can install ventilation systems, soil depressurization systems, and seal entry routes for radon gas in existing homes. New homes are built with radon-resistant features. To learn more about radon and to obtain a list of radon mitigation contractors, visit the DPH Radon Program website at www.ct.gov/radon.
Additional resources: NDDH https://www.nddh.org/services/community-health/radon/
EPA https://www.epa.gov/radon and the CDC https://www.cdc.gov/radon/index.html.

.
 



The rules
for winter
mail
delivery
U.S. Postal Service officials ask for the public’s cooperation in keeping mailboxes, steps, and sidewalks clear of snow and ice, so letter carriers are able to provide the safest, most efficient delivery service possible.
Some tips:
Clear enough snow from curbside boxes to allow mail trucks to approach the box, deliver the mail without leaning out too much, and to drive away from the box without danger of the need for backing. Generally, this requires 15 feet cleared on the coming and going sides of the mailbox.
Walkways should be cleared of snow and ice and allow enough traction to avoid slips, trips or falls.
Steps should also be kept clear of ice and snow and in good repair so as not to cause injury to the letter carriers or others who visit the customer’s home.
Overhangs should be clear and free of snow and ice to avoid injury.
Residents who receive delivery to roadside mailboxes also must keep the approach to, and exit from, the mailbox clear of snow or any other obstacles, like trash cans and other vehicles.  The carrier needs to get in, and then out, without leaving the vehicle or backing up.

.
 



East Putnam
fire ruled
accidental
PUTNAM — A fire that leveled an East Putnam Home Dec. 20 has been ruled accidental by the Putnam Fire Marshal’s office.
The structure fire at 271 Elmwood Hill Road, East Putnam, was reported at 8:49 p.m. Dec. 20 in a 911 call to Quinebaug Valley Emergency Communications.
Upon arrival of the East Putnam Fire Chief the single-family cape was fully involved with flames coming from every window and through the roof.
A rapid response by firefighters prevented damage to a nearby barn and farm equipment that was threatened by the intense heat and embers. The house was unoccupied at the time of the fire. The fire  marshal’s office said the fire had gone unnoticed for an uncharacteristic amount of time due to its secluded location. The 2,200-square foot residence and attached garage collapsed roughly 20 minutes after the fire departments’ arrival. The fire was reported under control at 10:36 P.M. with units remaining on scene for overhaul operations.
After an investigation, the Putnam Fire Marshal’s Office determined the fire to be accidental. Due to the extent of damage, fire investigators were on scene until 02:45 the next morning examining the fire scene. Investigators said the fire originated within the kitchen refrigerator and quickly spreading throughout the rest of the home. The building and all contents are estimated to be a total loss.  
There were no reported injuries to civilians or firefighters. If anyone has information concerning this fire or any other fire incident in Putnam, they are asked to call the Putnam Fire Marshal’s Office at (860) 963-6800 ext112.

.
 

RocketTheme Joomla Templates