Past Issues of the Putnam Town Crier


captions, from top:

Steve Gerling at Black Pond

Ted Hebert at Pomfret Rod and Gun Club. A sign was also placed at Mashamoquet State Park.



You may see some colorful new signs at popular fishing access sites in the northwest part of the Quiet Corner in the next few weeks.
 The Thames Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited (TU), with the support of local sportsmen’s clubs, is launching a campaign to encourage more catch and release fishing.
Gary Lussier, president of the Thames Valley Chapter of TU, said: “The intent is not to discourage people who like to enjoy a fresh trout now and then (who doesn’t?) but to raise awareness of the benefits of catch and release with minimal harm to the fish.”
Figures from Andrew Bale of the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection show about 120,000 freshwater licenses and permits being issued.
This includes about 80,000 trout stamps. Plus who knows how many younger kids who don’t’ need licenses. At the same time the state stocks about 500,000 catchable size trout annually.
According to Steve Gerling, coordinator of the project: “Fishing provides a truly great opportunity to enjoy the best of the outdoors But with those numbers it’s not hard to see why the lakes and streams can be quickly depleted of trout when many people keep their entire catch at every outing.”
He added: “The main message of the campaign is that more catch and release will yield better fishing for more of the season. Especially in the case of trout, this also increases the possibility of more 'holdover' fish and ups the chances for natural reproduction in our lakes and streams.
"The signs give tips on how to minimize injury to your catch, and will even have a small pair of pliers attached for those who wish to bend down hook barbs at waterside.”
In addition to the Thames Valley Chapter of Trout Unlimited, the following clubs added their endorsement and support to the effort: Putnam Fish and Game Club, Pomfret Rod and Gun Club, Eastern Ct. Sportsman’s Club (Ashford), Fin, Fur, and Feather Club (Chaplin) and Stafford Fish and Game Club.
All of these groups ask you to please consider Catch and Release. It makes for better fishing for everyone.

.
 



PUTNAM — The Putnam II Leo Club has been selected by local Stop & Shop store leadership as the benefiting non-profit in the Stop & Shop Community Bag for the month of April.
Every month every Stop & Shop location picks a local non-profit to benefit from the sale of the reusable Community Bag. The Putnam II Leo Club was selected as the April beneficiary by the Stop & Shop store on Providence Pike (Rt. 44).
The Putnam II Leo Club will receive a $1 donation for every $2.50 reusable Community Bag purchased at this location in April. All proceeds will be given back to local charities.
“It’s more important than ever to help reduce single-use plastic in the environment and give back to those in need,” said Connor Vassar, president of the Putnam II Leo Club, “Non-profits at the local level, like us, are in need of community support. This program offers the perfect solution to multiple issues of the world today. We hope you will support us in April by purchasing one – or two! – Community Bags at our local Stop and Shop!”
The Putnam II Leo Club is a non-profit youth community service club sponsored by the Lions Club International and the Putnam Lions Club. The club has students from neighboring communities and from several grade levels, most of whom are 12-18 years of age. For more info: https://www.e-leoclubhouse.org/sites/putnam2/.

.



Woodstock Elementary/Middle
Everyday: Fruit. Monday: Hot dogs, baked beans. Tuesday: Mozzarella sticks, marinara sauce. Wednesday: Popcorn chicken, sweet potato fries. Thursday: Pasta, meatsauce, green beans.  Friday: Pizza, corn.
Putnam Elementary/Middle
Monday - Breakfast for lunch: French toast sticks, scrambled eggs, hash browns. Tuesday: Chicken sandwiches, carrots. Wednesday - Wolf Meal: Beef burgers with cheese, sherbet. Thursday (2 hour delay): Fiesta beef nachos. Friday: Stuffed-crust pizza, Caesar salad.
Putnam High
Monday: Pasta Bolognese or spicy chicken sandwiches. Tuesday: General Tsos Chicken or bacon cheeseburgers. Wednesday: Chicken Parm lasagna or chicken and cheese quesadillas. Thursday (2-hour delay): Cheesy Beef Tot-Chos or calzone pizza boli. Friday: French bread pizza or mozzarella sticks with marinara sauce.

.
 


Promoted
Alexis Macha has been promoted to assistant branch manager of bankHometown’s Gore Road, Webster, office. Macha, of Putnam, joined bankHometown as a teller in 2019 and was promoted to personal banker in 2020. Before joining the bank, she held a number of positions in customer service, issues resolution, and retail sales. Macha has completed coursework at both Quinebaug Valley Community College and Western Governors University.

.
 



Diving deeper
into social and
emotional health
WOODSTOCK — As the third school year affected by the pandemic steadily remains strenuous, the focus on students’ social and emotional health continues to be prioritized. The Woodstock Academy has made persistent efforts to support students socially and emotionally including additional student support staff, school-based mental health services, training for teachers, and increased opportunities for open discussion in classrooms and advisory.
 “We are keenly aware of how crucial it is to be innovative and make concerted efforts to address our student’s social and emotional needs,” said Chris Sandford, head of school. “We truly believe it is the responsibility of all educational institutions to not only provide educational support, but also social and emotional support to protect the mental health of our youth.”
To meet these needs, The Woodstock Academy has hired a full-time member of the student support staff team and will continue to provide school-based mental health services through its recent partnership with Silver Linings Counseling. School-based counseling allows students to begin therapy much sooner and eliminates the need for transportation to and from appointments, which has a direct impact on students’ mental health and well-being.
“Over the past two years, The Academy has made several changes to better meet the social-emotional needs of our students,” said Karin Hughes, dean of student affairs. “Through our partnership with Silver Linings Counseling, our students have had direct and ongoing access to counseling services. A significant increase in need for services, combined with fewer resources in our local area, means that many community-based providers have lengthy waitlists, or have stopped taking new clients altogether.”
In addition, The Woodstock Academy recently hired a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst, Christopher Smith, to work with students on behavioral issues such as school avoidance. Because this varies by student, Smith can recommend support and interventions that are individualized for each student and their unique needs.
Faculty and staff have continued to receive professional development throughout the year to assist in their focus on social-emotional learning.
“As we aim to provide support by any means necessary, we continue to ask ourselves ‘What is best for our students? What needs do our students have? How can we partner with families to meet those needs?’” said Sandford.

.
 

RocketTheme Joomla Templates