Past Issues of the Putnam Town Crier



'Swamped' with Help
The Putnam Fire Department held a boot drive and donation event Feb. 3 to benefit two families who lost everything in two recent fires. The generosity of the community was impressive. Linda Lemmon photo.

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The following charges were listed in the Putnam Police Department logs.  The people charged are innocent until proven guilty in court. The Town Crier will publish dispositions of cases at the request of the accused. The dispositions must be accompanied by the proper documentation. The Putnam Police Department confidential Tip Line is 860-963-0000.
Feb. 3
Robin A. Moorhouse, 68, Plum Road, N. Grosvenordale; OUI, improper turn.
Tyronne L. Pierce, 53, Colonel Ledyard Hwy., Ledyard; breach of peace.

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Brad Favreau was a familiar face around the Woodstock Academy softball program for a while.
He served as an assistant coach for Jay Gerum, starting in 2013 before stepping aside following the 2019 season. Gerum resigned as head coach last June and  Favreau was tapped to replace him as head coach.
“I’m excited about the opportunity, excited about working with the players. It’s a good mix of returnees between experienced and youth. Jay did a fantastic job building this program back to where we are competitive, playing for championships in the league and being competitive at the state level,” Favreau said.
The Centaurs finished 16-8; won the ECC  Div. II title; and made it as far as the ECC tournament semifinals and second round of the Class L state tournament.
Favreau has been a jack-of-all trades when it comes to coaching.
He was the head softball coach at Griswold from 1997-2000.
He has also coached Little League and summer ball.
He has coached boys’ and girls’ basketball - he currently serves as an assistant coach for the Centaurs girls program – boys’ soccer and girls’ soccer.
He likes the variety. “You can, kind of, shift gears and can focus on other skills and approaches. You’re focused on one skill set with basketball, then you change and softball is another level of skill set. Bottom line is that you’re still coaching kids and that’s where the consistency comes in,” Favreau said. “You’re dealing with adolescents who want to get better and want to perform at a high level. Although it’s all different, it’s all intertwined.”
“I’ve always learned that you learn a lot from your assistant coaches and from those coaches you have worked under. You also learn from the kids. You see a lot of different styles,” Favreau said.
Different voices are always good as athletes progress.
“It’s just when they become conflicted,” Favreau said. “I have always been one that if you can get instruction that will help you as a player down the road, I’m very supportive of that. If it’s a situation where the instruction one is receiving is counterproductive, I’m against it. As a whole, it’s OK to get other instruction dependent on the timing. Playing extra innings in the summer is beneficial as long as athletes are giving themselves time to rest.”
He’s also a firm believer that playing other sports is beneficial because of the different skill sets gained, different muscles used and the necessary mental break from the primary sport.
Pitching is still the key to softball success and the Centaurs will be ready in the circle come this spring.
“One of the nice things about coming in fresh is that you can make your own evaluations during the pitching/catcher conditioning and tryouts. Grace (Delsanto), who saw significant time last year, is back as a junior. Kaya Nichols and Lily Morgis can also throw.
Favreau doesn’t have to wait all that long to change from basketball to softball mentality. Conditioning for pitchers and catchers begins on March 9 with the first practice day a week later and the first games of the season can be played on March 30.
Marc Allard
Director of Sports Information
The Woodstock Academy

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caption:

Dedication
From left: Tina Lajoie, Michael Rocchetti, Robert St Onge, Richard Morrison, Eugene Gerum, Robert Babitt, Dick Stapleton, Anne Arnold, and Quentin Frost.



DAYVILLE — The Mayotte-Viens American Legion Post 13 from Putnam recently presented and dedicated an American Flag to the residents at the Country Living Facility at Westview Commons.
According to Post 13 Commander Michael Rocchetti “a few month’s ago Robert St Onge, a Westview resident and member of Post 13, proposed the idea of presenting the flag to the Veteran’s group at Westview Commons – the Post membership unanimously approved of this”.
St Onge, a U.S. Army veteran and past Post 13 Commander (1968-1970), said: “We have a group of about 40 veterans at Westview Commons – representing all the branches of the U.S. military, and we needed an American flag for the large dining room where we commonly have patriotic obeservances on occasions such as Memorial Day, the 4th of July, and on Veterans Day, so this is wonderful – to have this big beautiful flag, a tremendous flag and flag stand.”
The flag was made in America, with stars and stripes fringed in gold. It stands about 8 feet tall, on a wooden flag pole, supported by a sturdy base. Louise Taylor, the Activities Director was thrilled: “We are so thankful that Post 13 donated this flag and presented it in such a solemn and dignified ceremony”.
Commander Rocchetti was the Master of Cermonies for the presentation and dedication of the flag which consited of an introduction, an invocation – which was given by Post 13 Junior Vice Commander Tina Lajoie— a recitation of a poem by Wilbur Nesbit called “Your Flag, My Flag”, and the dedication of the colors with a Pledge of Allegiance and a final salute to the flag. Ceremonial participants from Westview Commons included Robert St Onge (U.S. Army), Richard Morrison (USAF), Eugene Gerum (U.S. Army), Robert Babitt  (U.S. Army), Dick Stapleton (USAF), Anne Arnold (USAF), and Quentin Frost (U.S. Army). “One of the purposes of our American Legion organization, as stated in the preamble to our constitution, is to ‘foster and perpetuate a 100 percent Americanism’, ceremonies such as this demonstrate what that’s all about. We love our country, and we are blessed and grateful to be Americans,” said Rocchetti.

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When they’re playing this well, even the losses don’t feel as bad.
PSA’s Prep basketball team has turned its season around since losing nine of its first 20 games, so Tuesday’s loss in a much-ballyhooed affair against Overtime Elite’ OSL Jelly Fam was viewed as just a blip and one heck of a ballgame.
PSA responded by reeling off three wins in the aftermath, including a dismantling of Mt. Zion Academy, the fifth-ranked team in the country, Thursday.
“We’re playing hard,” coach Tom Espinosa said, “and that’s been a big difference. Guys are really working, and we just really feel like we’re on our way up.”
Justin Johnson had 29 points and Ben Ahmed finished with 19 and nine rebounds against Jelly Fam, which features three of the Top 100 prospects in the Class of 2024 (including No. 8 Ian Jackson, who is committed to North Carolina), but PSA went cold in a seven-minute span of the second half and had its six-game winning streak snapped with the 90-86 loss.
Grant Randall hit a 3-pointer at the 10-minute mark to give PSA a 65-59 lead, but the Mustangs made just one of their next eight shots (plus four free throws) and fell behind 81-71 with 3:13 to go.
Still, PSA had a chance at the end. Johnson made three free throws with 41.9 seconds left, getting PSA within 86-84. The Mustangs then got a steal on the ensuing inbound play, but almost immediately turned it back over. Jelly Fam made one free throw before Fallou Gueye scored in the lane to make the score 87-86.
PSA again stole the pass on the inbound with 15 seconds remaining, but Gueye had the ball stripped away as he got into the paint. An intentional foul was then called on PSA, giving Jelly Fam two free throws (which they made) and possession of the ball. They made one more free throw for the final score.
PSA put it behind them quickly though, dropping Mt. Zion behind Gueye’s 17 points, five rebounds, four assists, and four steals, and Ahmed’s 13th double-double of the season (13 points, 12 rebounds). Oswin Erhunmwunse finished with six points, 10 boards, and three blocks, and Tony Williams chipped in 13 points. Derrick Morris didn’t score but did pull down six rebounds, had two assists, two steals, blocked a shot, and played terrific defense.
Erhunmwunse scored a career-high 20 points Saturday to go along with 11 rebounds and four blocked shots, leading PSA to a 93-68 win over Dynastie Academy, a last-minute fill-in after PSA’s original opponent cancelled. Williams added 13 points and five assists, and Morris had two points, seven rebounds, six assists, and a pair of steals for PSA.
PSA beat another team from Canada Sunday, topping Thetford Academy 96-67. Gueye continued his recent run of strong play, finishing with a career-high 23 points, plus four rebounds, three steals, and three assists. Over his last five games, the 6-6 point guard is averaging 15.0 points, 5.6 rebounds, 4.0 assists, and 2.4 steals.
Erhunmwunse dominated play in the second half, scoring 13 of his 18 points and grabbing six of his eight rebounds after halftime. Ahmed finished with 11 points and six rebounds, and Grant Randall added 10 points and four boards for PSA (20-10). Williams also had another solid game, chipping in seven points, four rebounds, three assists, and five steals in the win.
Stephen Nalbandian
Sports Information Director
Putnam Science Academy

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